Interesting facts about mango trees

For centuries, mango trees are symbolized in South Asian countries as wish-granting trees. This is part 2 of the Mango – A wish-granting tree mini-series.

If you have missed the previous section, then you can read about part 1 here:

Mango – A wish-granting tree (Part 1)

Let’s find out the mythical meaning of the mango trees in folklore and mythology in a deliciously tender way.

Already so much information is gathered about these majestic mango trees across the internet. That if we composed them then they tend to fill many volumes.

Even a single story about the mango tree manages to fill many papers. Will you agree with me if I say that a single fact about the mango tree requires comprehensive research and analysis? Yes? No?

I am not an obsessive person about trees in any way but I do think that there is always a need to know about what made them so attractive and beneficial in history along with their various meanings in ancient scripts. Therefore, I feel that the sole purpose of this mini-series is to outline the different aspects of mango trees.

In part 1, I have briefly appraised the origin and etymology of mango trees by narrating the marvelous journey of Aam-kay to mango.

Here in part 2, my sole motive is to highlight this topic in detail.

  • The history of mango trees in Buddhism


The Buddha love for mango trees

Can you see the flowers of mango trees produced in terminal panicles or clusters form? The mango tree full with scented flowers is a beautiful sight to behold in the late spring season.

I ended the last section by referring to an account that in ancient India there was a tradition of the ruling class to bestow titles to prominent people by using the names of mango varieties.

In some rare cases, it was noticed that there was also a custom of allotting an entire mango grove to respected people as a token for their love and devotion.

32. In the travelogue of renowned Buddhist pilgrims Fa-Hien and Sung-Yun, it is remembered that the Buddha was presented with a mango orchard as a sign of love and affection by Amradarika in 500 BC. This mango orchard was called Amravana and it is used as a place for meditation by Buddha.

Buddha himself is said to have found peace and serenity under a mango tree

33. The more fascinating thing is to know about the Amradarika herself. If you are aware of Urdu/Hindi languages then this word would look very familiar to you. Isn’t that? If you split the term Amradarika in two then it will reveal to you that Amra means mango and darika is a Sanskrit word that is used for the tree.

34. The more I came to know about her, the more I got marvel. The Amradarika as I came to know is a kind of a repentant prostitute. The term Buddhic Magdalen was used for her. In simplest words, she was the daughter of the mango tree. This is what I learned from some ancient scripts that she was very devoted to the Buddha and gave that garden as a charity to him.

35. As excerpted from this source,

“The lady Amra appears more natural. She is called the “Mango girl” in the Southern records…she was a courtesan, and otherwise called Ambapali.” Amba or ambha is a Punjabi word for mangoes.

Source: jetlands.com

Do you want to find out which legendry person used to meditate under the shade of a mango tree?

36. Though, the bodhi tree is where the Buddha finds enlightenment. But the legends also claim that Buddha himself is said to have meditated under a mango tree within a silent grove.

37. The Buddha performed miracles under the mango tree is not unknown to historians. The Great Miracle of Shravasti is said to have been performed in front of the mango tree when Gautam Buddha recreated various forms of himself.

38. Here is a proof of how an impression of a mango tree is found in the friezes on the Stupa of Bharut which dates back about 100 BC.

His multiple images in front of a mango tree is indeed a popular theme of Buddhist art.

Great Miracle at Savrasti (also called Miracle of the Mango Tree) Sanchi Stupa 1 Northern Gateway

Mango trees as a symbol of peace, knowledge and fertility.

39. His multiple images in front of a mango tree are also a popular theme of Buddhist art. Besides the famous miracle, it is also believed that Gautam Buddha preferred the lush mango groves to rest.

40. I guess this is the reason why the large Buddhist community around the world appoints the mango trees as a symbol of peace and fertility.

They also took mango trees as a symbol of knowledge because of the belief that Gautam Buddha used to perform miracles under the shade of mango trees.

41. The dedicated Buddhists through centuries used to plant mango trees to show gratitude and respect to the Buddha and his teachings. I know there was a practice of planting mango trees along with other plants in the courtyards of traditional South Asian settings some decades ago. That’s how they keep the tradition of planting native trees alive and keep going the momentum of thriving trees for centuries.

42. Here, I would like to mention that Buddhist monks are believed to have taken mango fruits with them when traveling from place to place especially for working or teaching in various places of the world for relatively short periods.

And therefore, introduced the fruit to Southern East Asia countries like Malaysia and China around the 4th and 5th century BC.

They have achieved this by planting seeds of mangoes beside the temples and nearby gardens. Usually, it took approximately 5 years for a mango tree to bear fruits from a seedling in the summer season.

The tale of present-day Srilanka conversion to Buddhism

43. Now, this was an interesting time in history when the entire nation was judge by the temperament of the ruler of that era.

According to the Great Chronicle of Ceylon, present-day Sri Lanka converted to Buddhism after an intense and symbolic conversation over mango trees between the Island’s King Tissa and Mahinda. The King was so touched and convinced of the Mahinda knowledge that he converted to Buddhism, and consequently, the rest of the island’s population.

What name does this tree bear, oh king?

44. As excerpted from this authentic source,

The Mahavamsa recorded:

“What name does this tree bear, O king?”

“This tree is called a Mango.”

“Is there yet another Mango besides this?”

“There are many mango trees.”

“And are there yet other trees besides this mango and the other mangos?”

“There are many trees, sir; but those are trees that are not mangoes.”

“And are there, besides the other mangoes and those trees which are not mangoes, yet other trees?”

“There are yet more of those than of my kin.”

“Is there yet any one besides the kinsfolk and the others?”

“There is yet myself, sir.”

“Good. Thou hast a shrewd wit, O ruler of men.”

Somehow this answer satisfied the Mahinda who initially came here to preach to them about his religion. He was impressed by the king’s quick wit and intelligence, and consequently he started preaching to the entire court.

**(I have provided the Links where they are expected & required).


I am ending this section here. I hope you like this effort and thanks for finding time to read it. Please like, share, and follow my blog so that I keep on writing about trees & more.


18 thoughts on “Mango – A wish granting tree (Part 2)

  1. I am a great lover of mangoes but didn’t know any of these details Rabia. Thank you so much.

    Incidentally today it is Budh Purnima.

    1. Oh I didnt know about that. I google it and came to know that it is an auspicious Buddhist festival to celebrate Buddha’s birthday. Many thanks for encouraging 👌💜

  2. Wow I love this ✍️👏; it is a good follow-up to Part 1 which was exemplary, and on its own Part 2 is extremely insightful. Great work Rabia 💕☺️🌹

    1. Thank you, Killa. I was patiently waiting to hear your insights on this one. And here you goes, brilliant as ever. Thanks you.👌🌺🌳🥭

      1. Awww your words ☺️🥰. You are welcome Rabia; it’s an honor to know that you really wanted to hear from me an I could not be happier to share my thoughts with you 🤗💐.

        How you incorporated the images and linked back to various sources of reference and how you managed to tie everything together with your very informed and detailed explanations is marvelous 🤩 🙌🌹🙏

        1. Hey, it’s always a pleasure to read your comments.
          I tried my best to give justice to what I am writing about. Though, I think there is always a need of improvement in my writing. Thanks for appreciating. 👌👍🎈🌺🥭🥭

        2. Extremely wise words luv, there is certainly always room for improvement 👌💯. I can tell that you put alot of effort and time into your topics and I encourage you to keep doing what you are doing because it really shows and I love it 👏✍️💕.

  3. I know, I see, I taste Mangoes from my own form every year but here I see only your flowerful thoughts riping into fruitful writings ✍excellent Rabia. By the way other insights are greatly good dear one 🥰👍

    1. Oh, it’s very impressive to know that you owned a family farm.
      I missed many things about my hometown. And one thing for sure is mango orchards that were on both sides of the highway. This was a very common side when we were entering or leaving Multan from the southern side. I usually write about those trees that once resonates with my soul decades ago.
      Thanks for the admiration, dear Suma.
      As you owned mango trees, I would love to hear the mango stories from the other side of the border 😍

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